Inge Franken

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fehrbelliner92:sylvia [2007/12/06 10:02]
ingefra
fehrbelliner92:sylvia [2007/12/20 09:56]
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 //Notes written by Regina St. for her sick friend Summer 2003// //Notes written by Regina St. for her sick friend Summer 2003//
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 My name is **Schulamith Khalef**, born in 1928 as **Sylvia Wagenberg** in Dessau. In either 1934 or 35 my mother Lia (Lea) moved to Berlin with me and my sister **Carla**. My father, who was divorced from my mother, emigrated to Palestine. Two years later my mother enrolled us in the Jewish children’s home/school in **Caputh**. **Gertrud Feiertag,** a pioneer in modern learning, was in charge of the home. She was my guardian until 1943. She died in the gas chambers in Auschwitz. I was the last person with whom she was able to exchange a few words. At that time she was already gravely ill. My name is **Schulamith Khalef**, born in 1928 as **Sylvia Wagenberg** in Dessau. In either 1934 or 35 my mother Lia (Lea) moved to Berlin with me and my sister **Carla**. My father, who was divorced from my mother, emigrated to Palestine. Two years later my mother enrolled us in the Jewish children’s home/school in **Caputh**. **Gertrud Feiertag,** a pioneer in modern learning, was in charge of the home. She was my guardian until 1943. She died in the gas chambers in Auschwitz. I was the last person with whom she was able to exchange a few words. At that time she was already gravely ill.
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 I can still remember today that my mother bought me a pretty dark blue taffeta dress with a white collar with hand-made embroidery. It was beautiful and I was delighted with it. How a child could be happy in that crazy time with just a dress! My sister Carla and I stayed with my mother until the beginning of 1939. Then she took us to the Jewish children’s home at 92 Fehrbelliner Street. I attended the Jewish school in Choriner Street. ​ I can still remember today that my mother bought me a pretty dark blue taffeta dress with a white collar with hand-made embroidery. It was beautiful and I was delighted with it. How a child could be happy in that crazy time with just a dress! My sister Carla and I stayed with my mother until the beginning of 1939. Then she took us to the Jewish children’s home at 92 Fehrbelliner Street. I attended the Jewish school in Choriner Street. ​
  
-{{fehrbelliner92:​wagenberg.jpg?​300}}{{fehrbelliner92:​sylvia wagenberg.jpg?​243}} +|{{fehrbelliner92:​wagenberg.jpg?​400}}|{{fehrbelliner92:​sylvia wagenberg.jpg?​324}}| 
-FIXME Bildunterschrift ​Sylvia Wagenberg ​Foto Regina ​ST.+^Sylvia Wagenberg\\ Photo: Regina St.^Sylvia Wagenberg\\ Photo: ​Regina ​St.^
  
 **Fräulein Bamberger**,​ who ran the home, welcomed us.  Unfortunately my sister Carla soon left because she went to **Neuendorf** to get agricultural training in preparation to her emigration to Palestine. The Jewish children’s home in the Fehrbelliner Street was, at that time, run according to Jewish tradition and followed Jewish rules. It was completely different to that in Caputh. These two homes cannot be compared. Caputh lay outside the town in a beautiful natural setting. The home in the Fehrbelliner Street lay in the city centre and in 1939 the war had already broken out. The consequences of the anti-Semitism,​ and the laws that followed became more merciless. I stayed in the Fehrbelliner Street from 1939 until it was closed down in summer 1942. At the beginning my big sister was with me, but when she went to Neuendorf I felt very lonely indeed, because my parents were also not in Berlin. ​ **Fräulein Bamberger**,​ who ran the home, welcomed us.  Unfortunately my sister Carla soon left because she went to **Neuendorf** to get agricultural training in preparation to her emigration to Palestine. The Jewish children’s home in the Fehrbelliner Street was, at that time, run according to Jewish tradition and followed Jewish rules. It was completely different to that in Caputh. These two homes cannot be compared. Caputh lay outside the town in a beautiful natural setting. The home in the Fehrbelliner Street lay in the city centre and in 1939 the war had already broken out. The consequences of the anti-Semitism,​ and the laws that followed became more merciless. I stayed in the Fehrbelliner Street from 1939 until it was closed down in summer 1942. At the beginning my big sister was with me, but when she went to Neuendorf I felt very lonely indeed, because my parents were also not in Berlin. ​
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 Mrs. Khalef died shortly after dictating her story in Tel Aviv. Mrs. Khalef died shortly after dictating her story in Tel Aviv.
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-Übersetzung:​ Jeanette Davidson 
  
 [[thanks#​jeanette_davidson|Translation Jeanette Davidson]] [[thanks#​jeanette_davidson|Translation Jeanette Davidson]]